Viking Still lives

I conceptualised, art directed and directed these still lives for an exhibition about the Gokstad Viking Ship, one of Norway's national treasures. The photos were lit and taken by Kirsten Jensen Helgeland of the Museum of Cultural History in Oslo. The idea was to place original artifacts into a living environment, to bring them to life, with Still life as a story telling vehicle. Four new pictures have been added depicting artefacts from two other viking burials.

Viking horse gear found in a burial mound, here depicted as a winter burial at the point of sacrifice.
Here the comb is the original artefact, a thousand years old, it would have looked like the white knife handle behind in its day. All the other items are beautiful reconstructions loaned by viking reenactors.
In the original series, the field archeologist had a picture dedicated to them. Here we dedicate a still life to the hard working conservators who painstakingly retreive artefacts from the edge of destruction and preserve them for posterity.
The shovel is evidence of viking burial mound desecration, as one family of warlords moved in on another and sought to disempower them.
This still life was set up to contrast with the simple breakfast in a tent image. Here we see the bedpost of Gokstad Man, who was opulent enough to be burried with peacocks, not to mention an entire viking ship that stands today in the ships museum in Oslo.
Still life showing original game board and gaming piece from the Viking Gokstad Ship residing at the Ships Museum in Oslo.
My personal favourite, the Viking smithy, with awesome glowing prop smelting pot made by Steinar Karstein.
In this still life, the original artifact is the breadboard, complete with 1000 year old marks from a viking knife.
This still life was to show the archeologist in the field. Original uncleaned artifacts are in their ziplock bags.
An important part of the still life idea was to give vibrancy and colour to the viking period, and as the vikings certainly sailed to the Mediterranean, ship and fishhook artefacts are presented alongside some exotic still life staples.
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